Category Archives: Renewable energy

Draft guidelines for wind farm developments in NSW

Two days before Christmas NSW Planning Minister Brad Hazzard released a draft of “the toughest guidelines in the world” for wind farm developments in this State (details of where to find a copy at the end of this post). CANWin member David Tranter kicks off our discussions in this post. You can click “Leave a comment” (under the title) to add your thoughts.

The  NSW Government Draft Wind Turbine Strategy states that it supports Australia’s commitment to deliver 20% of the nation’s energy needs by 2020. If this is true, then the primary goal of the strategy should be to establish a level playing field. Up till now, fossil fuel industries have been implicitly subsidized by allowing them to offload their environmental costs to society.

The Government’s proposed Wind Farm Strategy doesn’t just perpetuate that inequity; it exacerbates it. It proposes an elaborate system of regulations for wind farms, which is not applied in equal measure to fossil fuel industries and will eventually prove to be counter-productive. How could any reasonable person believe that a wind turbine is more unsightly than high voltage transmission towers and power lines snaking inexorably across the rural landscape? Continue reading

Clean Energy Workshop: First reactions

Matthew Wright discusses the zero carbon energy generation

Matthew Wright, CEO of Beyond Zero Emissions, gave a summary of existing technologies capable of meeting Australia’s electricity needs within 10 years. Some of these are practical for Wingecarribee.

The energy and enthusiasm of more than 100 Wingecarribee locals stored information and set ideas flowing.
Clean energy is practical now.
Keep watching this website for more information.

Updates:

Preliminary draft of the proceedings is now available here.

Press reports from the workshop:
Local champions for clean energy
Think tank yields clean energy ideas
People power behind clean energy

CANWin Workshop: A Clean Energy Future for Wingecarribee

Sunday, 20 Nov 2011, 1.00pm – 5.00pm

at

Kazcare, Bowral  (Corner Centennial & Kirkham Roads)

Your chance to discuss clean energy options for Wingecarribee with a panel of experts:
What clean energy options make sense for our community?
What can we learn about clean energy from other regions?
What practical steps can locals take to move to clean energy?
Continue reading

Call for rapid transition to 100% renewables

CANWin joined 68 other Climate Action Groups in a joint ‘Submission on Discussion Papers to the Energy White Paper Secretariat’

JOINT PRESS RELEASE 29th May 2009

69 Climate Action Groups Call for Rapid Transition to 100% Renewables!

69 Climate Action Groups representing thousands of people from across the country have called for a major “paradigm shift” in Australia towards 100% renewable electricity. Continue reading

Cogeneration (combined heat and power) – a bridge to the future?

Reuters News Service – Woking in England is a town of 90,000 people that has slashed emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from civic buildings by 77 percent and its success is proving a model for giants like nearby London and other cities.

“We see ourselves as a pathfinder for others,” said Mick Company, Woking’s climate change project manager. “We are very proud of our successes. Our long-term strategy is to spread what we are doing here to the world.” Woking’s main Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant provides heating, lighting and cooling to the main carpark, the town hall, a local hotel, a conference centre and an amusement arcade. It will soon power an art gallery and museum as well.

The plant burns gas to generate electricity, captures the exhaust heat — most of which is lost from conventional power stations — and uses it to supply hot water. It has a maximum capacity to generate 1,300 kilowatts of electricity, 1,600 KW of heat and 1,200 KW of cooling. Woking is even testing self-powered street lights, comprising two arms with energy-generating solar panels and a cylindrical wind turbine as a head. Continue reading