Solar and Battery Bulk Buy Opportunity: Tues Nov 15, Moss Vale

When: Tue, 15 Nov, 6 pm for a 6:30 pm start
Where: Moss Vale Services Club auditorium, Argyle Street, Moss Vale, NSW 2577

There’s still time to RSVP at: www.suncrowd.com.au/southern-highlands

More than 200 Highlands locals have already booked for this event, in order to:

  • Receive 1-on-1 expert advice,
  • Experience world leading solar & battery brands, and
  • Learn all you need to know about solar & batteries to help you make an informed decision on the best home energy solution for you.

You too can meet the suppliers and your local installer. Ask them whatever questions you may have!

What you need to bring

  • A copy of a recent electricity bill (so that we can size your system to your personal energy needs)
  • Photos of both your meter and your meter switchboard – printed or on your mobile. Some tips:
    • Make sure that the resolution is sufficient so that we can read the meter specification. These photos will be attached to your personal application form on the night.
    • Information on the system size of your current solar power system (if you already have one installed)

You’ll have the unique opportunity to receive independent, expert advice from a Local Solar Mentors on the right home energy system for you. 
Bring a recent electricity bill for an optimal experience! 
Get friends and family involved!

The more the merrier

Invite fellow solar homeowners, your friends, family and colleagues to RSVP and join you at CANWin’s Suncrowd event!? They can RSVP here: www.suncrowd.com.au/southern-highlands

The greater the number of people that join your local campaign – the greater the savings for everyone involved. You don’t want your neighbours to miss out!

You can invite them by email, Facebook or knock on your neighbour’s door!

Tonight! Renewable energy bulk buy campaign begins on the Highlands

Mittagong RSL, 6 pm tonight (26 October)

Your opportunity to access world leading battery technology from brands including Tesla Energy LG Chem, and solar panels from Tindo Solar, Australia’s only Australian made and owned solar company. Reposit Power is also on board, helping bring the future of energy to people today. By harnessing their collective purchasing power, participants have the opportunity to access these leading technologies at $1k-$2k below average market prices.

Local community groups all over southern NSW are partnering with social enterprise SunCrowd, to enable one of the biggest renewable energy bulk buy campaigns ever seen in this country. The bulk buys will cover 5 regions, with free events in the Southern Highlands, Shoalhaven, Goulburn, the Blue Mountains and Wollongong.

Hand-picked community energy leaders from each region, trained by SunCrowd, will provide local, independent expert advice to enable individuals to find the right home energy solution for their household or small business.

One bulk buy of this kind took place in Newcastle throughout July of this year. The campaign was run in partnership with local community group, Climate Action Newcastle and was a roaring success – with over 998 solar panels and 201 batteries purchased by the local community. 193 households in the Newcastle region took part, benefitting from trusted technology and lower prices by working together.

The free Southern Highlands launch event, organised in partnership with community groups Climate Action Now Wingecarribee (CANWin) and Moss Vale Community Garden (MVCG) will be held in Mittagong next Wednesday 26th October. To secure your free ticket and get involved visit www.suncrowd.com.au/southernhighlands.

If you can’t attend tonight’s launch event you can still register your interest and find out more about how you can get involved in this exciting campaign.

By participating in the bulk buy you’ll not only benefit yourself, but enable your community to benefit as well through SunCrowd’s unique Community Benefit Scheme – which sees a portion of the revenue flow back into your local community to support the campaign partners and boost renewable energy projects.

SunCrowd is a movement of Australian households taking the power back into their own hands. The aim is to remove the decision-making complexity and confusion associated with new energy technologies, whilst using our collective purchasing power to lower prices.

Miles Lochhead, spokesperson for CANWin, explained: “With thousands of solar panel installations already in the Southern Highlands, we’re excited to provide locals with the opportunity to jump on board with the latest renewable technology, and in turn reduce our community carbon footprint. Even better, partnering with SunCrowd will enable locals to save money in the process and provide useful funds to support both CANWin and Moss Vale Community Garden”.

“With five communities joining this bulk buy spanning along the south coast from Ulladulla to Wollongong, and inland to Goulburn, the Southern Highlands and Blue Mountains in the west, there’s a real opportunity to benefit from a big discount off the normal retail prices.”

Chris Cooper, Chief Energy Officer at SunCrowd, also commented,

“For the first time in human history, we can create an energy system which is sustainable, affordable and democratic. But to make this dream a reality, it’s up to us – the people – to show leadership, act together, and take the power back. RSVP for your local event and let’s take the power back to the people!”

Find out more and RSVP for our local Southern Highlands event at suncrowd.com.au/southernhighlands

Our local solar and battery bulk-buy is here!!

We’re so excited! We’ve just launched a local bulk buy program in the Southern Highlands with SunCrowd!

suncrowdncle


To find out more and to join in the local community bulk buy campaign for solar and batteries, RSVP now to attend the local SunCrowd event:

Where: Mittagong RSL
When: 6-9pm Wednesday October 26

Local groups Climate Action Now Wingecarribee (CANWin) and the Moss Vale Community Garden are teaming up to bring solar technology to you in a way that’s affordable! The local groups are teaming up to make it easy, accessible, and at lower prices. With a huge 3,000 solar installations operating in the Highlands, you can join them, or if you are already enjoying energy from the sun, enhance your solar potential and SAVE!

On the back of the huge success of SunCrowd’s (& Australia’s) first ever solar & battery bulk buy in Newcastle earlier this year, residents in the Highlands can now participate. The Community Groups will benefit, you will be able to access the latest technology at the best price, and get free ‘smart’ advice on being energy wise – ethically, with no hard sell.

Here’s what you can expect at the event:

  • Receive expert information
  • Get one-on-one advice
  • Q & A with your local installer
  • See the technology & meet the suppliers
  • Access the exclusive campaign offers
  • Find out what to do if your Feed-In-Tariff is impacted by changes on 1st January 2017

So RSVP now — You don’t want to miss out!

Two locals, Miles Lochhead and Andy Lemann, both with a long history of working and advocating for sustainable causes, have come on board as SunCrowd event co-ordinators for the Highlands.

They can’t wait to help their local community improve energy management and access technology, affordably and ethically…..

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Vote for a safer climate

CANWin supports the #AYCC Australian Youth Climate Council in their campaign to #VoteClimate and to #PutOurFutureFirst. Here’s their Scorecard for the major parties:

AYCC climate scorecard

Election2016-AyCC scorecard

Getup have also prepared scorecards on climate and on renewable energy. For your information, here they are:

Getup climate scorecard

GetupClimateScorecard

Getup renewables scorecard

GetupElection16_nsw_renewables

The Economics of Solar Energy for Homes – Manuel Cilia

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A responsible nation?

Early or late, this year will bring a federal election where all voters can influence policy on emissions reduction and climate change. Philip Walker outlines some policy possibilities.

Australia must properly address its emissions reduction responsibilities now

Federal elections are approaching this year. There is a very important issue we are still not hearing much about. Many Australians are increasingly concerned about the future of our world under the effects of climate change. In spite of this, our decision makers continue to avoid addressing the issue seriously.

Australia remains one of the highest greenhouse gas-emitting countries, per unit of energy supply and consumption.

Dr Ross Garnaut

Ross Garnaut

Most Australians are not scientists, engineers or economists. It is difficult for many of us to hold an informed opinion about what measures should be taken in Australia in order to play our proper part in reducing carbon emissions world wide. However voters do have the opportunity to understand the fundamentals and to express their concerns.

A few years back we had the carbon tax. Some politicians, by stressing biased negative argument, soured public opinion about the tax, resulting in its repeal. However, there is considerable informed opinion worldwide advocating carbon taxes or fees to be the most effective form of carbon pricing to adequately address the problem.

A couple of US proposals could be applied to Australia

Economist William G. Gale, a US expert on tax policy, discussed options in the US economy at The Miller Center of the University of Virginia. He said: Carbon taxes would contribute to a cleaner, healthier environment and better environmental and energy policy by providing price signals to those who pollute. Not surprisingly, most analyses find that a carbon tax could indeed significantly reduce emissions.

Dr James Hansen

Dr James Hansen

Former NASA climate scientist James Hansen has proposed a “carbon fee” system under which fossil fuels are taxed when they are produced or imported, rather than when they are consumed. Under his proposal, countries would collect a fee when fossil fuels are mined or imported, and distribute the revenue to their citizens, while charging extra border duties to countries without a similar scheme.

Such carbon pricing, used effectively, would discourage emissions in favour of clean energy sources. Whilst accounting for the external costs of impacts on climate and environment, it fairly distributes compensation to the people. There should be no subsequent incentives to selected energy sources. The energy markets should be allowed to determine the mix of clean energy systems used.

In July 2015 Renew Economy published Hugh Saddler’s discussion of the take-home messages from abolition of Australian carbon tax, illustrating the proven effectiveness of the tax in Australia. In reading his conclusions, it is evident that the induced changes were modest in both supply and consumption but were what economic theory would have predicted. Larger impacts of a price on carbon will only appear if the policy is maintained over the long term. Many factors besides the carbon price have influenced changes in the behaviour of electricity consumers and suppliers. Achieving larger and faster emissions reductions will require a wide range of policies, all working in the same direction. A price on emissions, whether through an emissions trading scheme or a tax, will be a key component of such a suite, but only one component.

Professor Ross Garnaut, speaking at University of Technology, Sydney on 24th September 2015, said: Once emissions reduction responsibilities have been allocated amongst countries, it is possible for each country to contribute its share of the mitigation responsibility not only through the application of a Carbon Tax or an ETS, but also by direct regulation of emissions-intensive activity, or by fiscal payments to low-emissions activities, or through multifarious regulatory and fiscal interventions. He indicated that small countries with currently high emissions, like Australia, will not be able to resist indefinitely the pressure from the larger countries to do their fair shares in a global mitigation effort. Sooner or later proper action will be required, which will then be at higher cost than if steady progress had been made from an early time.

Sometimes in Australia we see the leading political parties’ bilateral support for action on selected issues. Why not with action on climate change?

We need to be continually demanding that our politicians put forward policies that, once implemented, would enable us to effectively play our part in addressing world climate change.

References

Economist William G. Gale, US expert on tax policy, discussing options in the US economy, at The Miller Center of the University of Virginia. The wisdom of a carbon tax

US environmental scientist James Hansen, addressing a “carbon fee” in The Conversation December 2, 2015. James Hansen: emissions trading won’t work, but my global ‘carbon fee’ will

Hugh Saddler, One Year on from the Carbon Price Australia’s Emissions Rebound is Clear, Renew Economy 22 July 2015

Professor Ross Garnaut, speaking at University of Technology, Sydney on 24th September 2015. The Essential Role of Carbon Pricing

Grow Cook Eat 2016 Festival – All Welcome

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Guest Speaker Forum – Battery Energy storage: Technology options and economic considerations

NBatt Speaker 110316