The Economics of Solar Energy for Homes – Manuel Cilia

Cilia-GSF-May2016

A responsible nation?

Early or late, this year will bring a federal election where all voters can influence policy on emissions reduction and climate change. Philip Walker outlines some policy possibilities.

Australia must properly address its emissions reduction responsibilities now

Federal elections are approaching this year. There is a very important issue we are still not hearing much about. Many Australians are increasingly concerned about the future of our world under the effects of climate change. In spite of this, our decision makers continue to avoid addressing the issue seriously.

Australia remains one of the highest greenhouse gas-emitting countries, per unit of energy supply and consumption.

Dr Ross Garnaut

Ross Garnaut

Most Australians are not scientists, engineers or economists. It is difficult for many of us to hold an informed opinion about what measures should be taken in Australia in order to play our proper part in reducing carbon emissions world wide. However voters do have the opportunity to understand the fundamentals and to express their concerns.

A few years back we had the carbon tax. Some politicians, by stressing biased negative argument, soured public opinion about the tax, resulting in its repeal. However, there is considerable informed opinion worldwide advocating carbon taxes or fees to be the most effective form of carbon pricing to adequately address the problem.

A couple of US proposals could be applied to Australia

Economist William G. Gale, a US expert on tax policy, discussed options in the US economy at The Miller Center of the University of Virginia. He said: Carbon taxes would contribute to a cleaner, healthier environment and better environmental and energy policy by providing price signals to those who pollute. Not surprisingly, most analyses find that a carbon tax could indeed significantly reduce emissions.

Dr James Hansen

Dr James Hansen

Former NASA climate scientist James Hansen has proposed a “carbon fee” system under which fossil fuels are taxed when they are produced or imported, rather than when they are consumed. Under his proposal, countries would collect a fee when fossil fuels are mined or imported, and distribute the revenue to their citizens, while charging extra border duties to countries without a similar scheme.

Such carbon pricing, used effectively, would discourage emissions in favour of clean energy sources. Whilst accounting for the external costs of impacts on climate and environment, it fairly distributes compensation to the people. There should be no subsequent incentives to selected energy sources. The energy markets should be allowed to determine the mix of clean energy systems used.

In July 2015 Renew Economy published Hugh Saddler’s discussion of the take-home messages from abolition of Australian carbon tax, illustrating the proven effectiveness of the tax in Australia. In reading his conclusions, it is evident that the induced changes were modest in both supply and consumption but were what economic theory would have predicted. Larger impacts of a price on carbon will only appear if the policy is maintained over the long term. Many factors besides the carbon price have influenced changes in the behaviour of electricity consumers and suppliers. Achieving larger and faster emissions reductions will require a wide range of policies, all working in the same direction. A price on emissions, whether through an emissions trading scheme or a tax, will be a key component of such a suite, but only one component.

Professor Ross Garnaut, speaking at University of Technology, Sydney on 24th September 2015, said: Once emissions reduction responsibilities have been allocated amongst countries, it is possible for each country to contribute its share of the mitigation responsibility not only through the application of a Carbon Tax or an ETS, but also by direct regulation of emissions-intensive activity, or by fiscal payments to low-emissions activities, or through multifarious regulatory and fiscal interventions. He indicated that small countries with currently high emissions, like Australia, will not be able to resist indefinitely the pressure from the larger countries to do their fair shares in a global mitigation effort. Sooner or later proper action will be required, which will then be at higher cost than if steady progress had been made from an early time.

Sometimes in Australia we see the leading political parties’ bilateral support for action on selected issues. Why not with action on climate change?

We need to be continually demanding that our politicians put forward policies that, once implemented, would enable us to effectively play our part in addressing world climate change.

References

Economist William G. Gale, US expert on tax policy, discussing options in the US economy, at The Miller Center of the University of Virginia. The wisdom of a carbon tax

US environmental scientist James Hansen, addressing a “carbon fee” in The Conversation December 2, 2015. James Hansen: emissions trading won’t work, but my global ‘carbon fee’ will

Hugh Saddler, One Year on from the Carbon Price Australia’s Emissions Rebound is Clear, Renew Economy 22 July 2015

Professor Ross Garnaut, speaking at University of Technology, Sydney on 24th September 2015. The Essential Role of Carbon Pricing

Grow Cook Eat 2016 Festival – All Welcome

GCE20032016

Guest Speaker Forum – Battery Energy storage: Technology options and economic considerations

NBatt Speaker 110316

Plant to plate On the Grow for kids in the Highlands

OtGforkidsintheHighlands

The On the Grow (OtG) team of coordinators is all set to take out the OtG veggie seedling kit to twelve local schools in the first two weeks of February, kicking off at Colo Vale Public School on the 1st February. They will offer an hour-long information/activity session for primary age children The session would involve a potting up activity, educating kids about the importance of backyard food to our health and what they need to know about growing on seedlings to have growing success at home and at school. They will also be providing them with three seedlings each to take home and nurture to maturity until they end up on the dinner plate. Our thanks go to Speedy Seedlings Leppington and Southern Phone Community Grant program for making this project possible.

Link

Railway Street Farmers Market

RailwayStFarmersMkt

‘Much excitement as the launch day approaches for the new weekly Railway Street Farmers Market on Thursday 28th January. Some of our anchor stalls include:
• Moonacres Farm (Fitzroy Falls) supplying a wide range of certified organic vegetables harvested that day.
• Tennessee Orchard (Yerrimbool) with fresh farm vegetables and their famous apples soon in season
• Flour Water Salt (featured on Food Safari Fire SBS 21st January 8pm) with artisan sourdough bread and pastries
• Snax on Trax – Simona’s organic fair trade coffee and yummy snacks to enjoy while you do the weekly food shopping
• Chiron Farm (Robertson) – Pi Wei’s delicious nashi pears(from February) and backyard treats
• Bare Greens (Canyonleigh) – pick your own salad greens and herbs from live produce towers – couldn’t be more fresh.
• Curly’s Compost to help your home garden grow productively
• Moss Vale and Bundanoon Community Gardens – with a range of produce, preserves, and live plants.
For more information on additional local growers you can meet at the Railway Street Farmers Market go to –
https://www.facebook.com/Railway-Street-Farmers-Market-Moss-Vale-187900588230499/

Community energy for the Highlands

CANWin Speaker, 21 August 2015
…renewable energy projects which are truly win-win projects for the environment, the economy and the local community

Sure beats a coal mine.

Come along and find out more. See you there.

Frackman: What CSG mining does for Australians

UPDATE: The movie Frackman is being screened in GOULBURN 29th May, 6-30 pm at the Soldiers Club, tickets must be bought in advance through http://frackmanthemovie.com/

Dayne Pratzky was chasing the great Australian dream when he upped sticks from the city and moved to Tara in south east Queensland. He bought a bush block to build a house and make a home.

One day a gas company man drove down Dayne’s driveway, “He told me we’re gunna sink a well down the back of your place and if you don’t like it, there’s nothing you can do about it.”

Dayne shares his story in a gripping new film that has been five years in the making: Frackman. It’s the real life story of what happened when coal seam gas came to Australia. In Frackman we share Dayne’s trials and triumphs, as he and his neighbours work together to fight back against coal seam gas.
It’s the must-see cinema event of the year and the film that Bob Brown says no Australian should miss.

Click for cinema bookings, other viewing options, and more information

Local (more or less) cinemas coming up:

Wed. Mar 18, 6:30 PM – CAMDEN Civic Centre
Thur. Mar 19, 7:00 PM – CAMPBELLTOWN Event Cinemas
Sat. Mar 21, 7:00 PM – KANGAROO VALLEY Upper Kangaroo River Community Hall – SOLD OUT
Sun. Mar 22, 4:00 PM – WARRAWONG Gala Cinema
Wed. Mar 25, 7:00 PM – NEWTOWN Dendy Newtown

Click for cinema bookings, other viewing options, and more information